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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 150 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the last 40 years: ivan, dennis, katrina. and katrina i was the commander of the medical forces in pensacola, florida, and i owned the branch clinics that existed in new orleans, pascagula and gulf port, mississippi. we thought we had dodged the bullet and then the levies broke and who would have predicted that there was a sea of humanity in the super dome that basically was in extreme miss? who would have predicted in this day and age we would lose many, many people based on the fact they couldn't be medevacked, that the hospitals themselves had been flooded and the hospital staff was having to carry critically ill patients up to the top floors to avoid the water that was filling in the rooms. who would have predicted that? and were we set up to handle that? and who would have predicted in the early goings there would be civic disorder and civic disobedience and lack of command and control and then the military came there and provided that stability for a while until the civic authorities took over and eventually got things moving in a fairly organized continuum. we learned
and even katrina and the gulf war spill most recently. closer to home the golden gate bridge connects not only our park lands but our communities. since 9/11 it really has connected our law enforcement public safety officials even more seriously and with greater intent as we protect the bridge from any threat. americas cup, the races here have fostered even greater coordination and partnership with the department of emergency management in the city, city fire department, city police department and the coast guard. and we look forward to working with san francisco and our local governments and the military to make our emergency planning even more effective. so, thank you again for your time and we'll see you out in the park. (applause) >> thank you. i learned a lot on that talk i didn't know. that was great. it's now my pleasure to introduce our speaker, keynote speaker for this morning. but before i do that, i want to recognize his wife. it is an honor for many women who are married to significant dignitaries in our country where they become the sponsors for various ships. and it's a
after hurricane katrina, which we all know will be probably the greatest civil engineering set of blunders that our country has made in our country's history. and what we all learn from hurricane katrina is what happens when we don't have a community that is prepared and a set of relationships that is ready to be hit by the big one. which leads me to the third reason why i wake up at night. the neighborhoods that i represent in the northeast not only represent the oldest neighborhoods in our city, but some of the most vulnerable. we have some of the poorest residents. half of my district are recent immigrants who are mono lingual. i have hundreds of constituents who live in buildings that contain them where they live three, four, five people in a room that might be no larger than 10 by 15 feet, in buildings that are absolutely prone to earthquake, fire, and the next major disaster. and, so, i was asked to just mention if i had three things that i want you to tell us as your civilian leaders. the first has to do with how to deal with community shock. two nights ago as a couple o
without power. >> new york gov. says hurricane sandy and katrina had a lot in common and none of it was good. superstar on sandy was worse in some ways compared to hurricane katrina. sandy did $42 billion worth of damage to new york. it costs more costly damage than katrina. >> in world news investigators had exhumed the palestinian leader to find out if he does poison by polonium. he died a decade ago after a sudden and severe illness. doctors from france, switzerland, and russia are going to take their own samples for independent analysis. authorities said high levels of the substance was found on araphats personal belongings. >> the fire that killed more than 100 textile workers by sabotage according to the bangladesh government. the worst ever industrial fire broke out on saturday and consumed in multistory factor. the interior minister said in a claccording to the investigation the fire was arson. >> coming up on the kron for a morning news we are following a developing story out of san francisco with the axis to and from treasure island on interstate 80 are closed due to
business bureau. fraud was so rampant in the wake of hurricane katrina in 2005 the government created a disaster fraud team which is said to have prosecuted nearly 1,500 people involved with running scams related to katrina and rita. meanwhile, countless americans are opening their wallets to victims of the superstorm. about $11.4 million so far has been donated to the red cross, two days after the storm. that's more than the $8 million donated after hurricane isaac. a music telethon dedicated to sandy and led by bruce springsteen, bon jovi and billy joel will air on nbc tonight. climate change failed to become a major headline story in the presidential election... until now. in the aftermath of hurricane sandy, new york mayor michael bloomberg noted the summer drought, melting ice caps and rising temputures as reasons to take action on climate change. then on thursday in a stunning move, bloomberg endorsed president obama, citing his record on climate change issues such as raising fuel emissions standards. meanwhile, gop vice presidential candidate paul ryan suggests taking another
disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in this room would likely be involved. but to go back, it's all -- for me it's all about relationships, it's all about communication and respecting each other's mission. we certainly appreciate our relationships with all 3 agencies up here. the last thing i would say with respect to technology, one of the thin
it in policy over the years and certainly things have advanced since 9/11 and hurricane katrina, but there has been a real gap in detailed preplanning for emergency response, particularly as it works its way down the chain into the tactical forces that would respond, most specifically i think those on active duty. this is an area that we don't tend to pay a lot of attention to and very often when it comes we tray to look the other way. i believe that we have been reasonably responsive in immediate response, immediate response by doctrine and policy are military dod authorities moving out their gates into their neighborhoods when a disaster hits right next door. i mean, that seems to make sense. we have good relationships at our bases and stations and the ability to roll out and assist is something you would expect to work out pretty well. some of that has matured, in fact. in the state of california we have established a number of agreements, most particularly the wildfires where both third fleet and the expeditionary force assign helicopters in the need we are requested, it's pre-planned, o
this firsthand, i went down to help out with katrina thing in september. it's weird. because you are dealing with people that lost everything and it's kind of hard to imagine that if you haven't done it yourself. basically, you know, she's looking at her curtains here, she probably hand-stitched those things. maybe they have been hanging there the last 5 or 6 years. everything in the house is wrecked, photos, keepsakes, it's a tough thing. and people deal with this kind of stress in different ways. we as disaster workers, we see it all the time. but we have a word we use, professional. we try to be professional around people that have suffered a loss like this because they don't want us to come -- you don't want to go into somebody's house and be joking and having a good time. it's unprofessional. when you are dealing with somebody who has a loss like this, just think of the word professional. that's what we try to do. this sort of body language here, she's trying to comfort here, do you think she's buying it? not with that body language. she's not really buying it. some people won't. some p
the way from 9-11 through katrina to whatever the next catastrophe is going to be. we live in a nuclear age. who would have predicted the united states would be fully invested in a response in japan? who would have predicted several years ago when a tsunami hit a country in indonesia which was predominately anti-american in its sentiment, mostly because of disinformation, mostly because as people grew up there they were given propaganda and told stories about the american those and what we do and how we do it, and they learned to feel we were the enemy. then they saw through that catastrophe, they saw the response of the lincoln battle group, they saw american military men and women in uniform as well as partnering with non-governmental organizations like project hope, operation smile, doctors without borders, they saw all those people coming off the ships and taking care of their loved ones, taking care of those who were hopeless and helpless. they saw that and it turned them around. it made the world a better place. it certainly made indonesia a better place, but it made the worl
up in flames and four other houses. >> we think back about katrina and what a big impact that was on our country, we rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm, we think of the aftermath. right now we're in the aftermath period in terms of sandy. tell me how you feel about that. and before we get to rebuilding, people taking care of continuing damage right now, how do you assess the coordination between the state, federal, and local municipalities? >> i think we're doing very well. i think the president's response has been terrific, really. it's been coordinated unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard governor christie, who is a republican with president obama working together, and that's how it's been from the president, to the governor, to the counties and the towns. one of the things that i did today was talk to fema about trying to get an office and staff person in various parts of the district today, and they're working on it, and with the money that comes to downs for recovery to rebuild board walks or municipal buildings, i t
a comparison with hurricane katrina. i want to use it as an analogy. but the analogy here that might be helpful, we think back to katrina and what that meant to us as a nation. we very rarely think about the wind and the rain that was the initial storm. right now we are in the aftermath period of this superstorm, sandy. how do you feel in terms of dealing with the aftermath, describing those explosions, these ongoing worries. before we get to rebuilding, rescuing people, taking care of continuing damage right now. how would you assess the response and the coordination between the federal government, the state government, municipalities. how are we doing? >> i think we're doing very well. i mean, you heard the president, and i have to say that i think his response has been terrific, really. and it's been coordinated, unlike some of what happened in katrina. and you heard, you know, governor christie, who's a republican, with president obama, working together. and that's how it's been, from the president to the governor, all the way down to the county and the towns. so one of the things that i di
politics. you know, there's the only guy to come out ahead in katrina by the way, because he knew how to get the job done. what do you think of that? they need to get a proctology -- when parties get their butts kicked like democrats did in '72, republicans did in '64, when they thought they had -- well, those races didn't look good to begin with, but right now what do you do when you're in a party leadership position? >> well, if they don't adhere to what bobby jindal is talking about, the senator from new hampshire, if they don't understand hailey barbour, i can assure you democrats are really going to get that message. and believe me, if democrats organized in the red state like they did in ohio this time around or like they did in florida this time around or like they did in one or two other states this time around, those red states would send the numbers that nancy pelosi needs to become speaker again. and that's going to happen if the republicans keep thinking like mitt romney. >> you know, that's the question, ashley, and that is as you see the demographic changes, younger vote
and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. did you discuss in this pharmaceuticals and how you would get your pharmaceuticals? >> we didn't specifically discuss it. we did i think in the shock trauma platoon know about what medications are carried on the c130, what medications were available. during the hhs presentation there was talk about the large manufacturers, if there were problems getting medications, that the federal government could facilitate that. but it is a great point. it's something locally we are working on with our pharmaceutical group because it is a big concern if we do lose supply how do we replenish that. san francisco does not have a lot of storage space so we are not able to store medications to a great extent in the area. >> i was just going to echo, our capability does come with its own internal pharmaceutical supply, although it is limited and so that would be important for us to understand what the resupply process would be as we move forward on that. so
were in hurricane katrina. they travel all laid to s.i. and volunteers as were asked by the media out why. they said they came to help us in the wake of katrina and now it's our turn to repay the favor. they fed the people as well as the first responders affected by the storm jambalaya and such. >> a lot of the people i can help us were new york firefighters. they help desk and they did things so we get the an opportunity to come out we got up here and start to cut the jambalaya. >> this storm is disposal for at least a hundred and 13 deaths. >> so many questions about what causes autism in children and doctors are finding in the possible link. a new study coming out this morning finds that women who had the flu while they were pregnant or twice as likely to have the child later diagnosed with optimism. those who had a fever that lasted a week or longer while there were present were three times as likely to have a child diagnosed with off to as a it affects one in every 88 children. >> we have more free ahead in this morning where monetary temperatures were in his chilly everywhere. t
occurs in the gulf port area during katrina. they expected us to learn from that and indeed we have. i caution you again, we are not prepared, we are not prepared for the next nightmare scenario, but we can better prepare ourselves every day with the activities you are taking on now. i thank you in advance for the family, the child, the son, the daughter, who has no idea that their life is going to be uprooted by catastrophe within the confines of the san francisco bay area or perhaps in a western pacific nation or in africa or south america. i thank you in advance for the good work you are going to do. because there's going to come a point, be it an ert quake, be it a tsunami, be it a man-made heinous terrorist catastrophe, that makes a large group of people feel helpless and feel hopeless. your efforts today, your passion, your commitment, your desire to make a difference, will give help and give hope to those people. it may be your family or it may be a family across the world. it is what we do, it is what you do and i'm proud to count myself among you. so i thank you i
katrina. and another key part of partnerships, when i was the federal on scene coordinator during deep water horizon, it's not in the national response framework, but every parish president, every mayor, every governor had a coast guard liaison officer at the oak pride and above level. so, if they didn't like how the response was going, go to my liaison officer. don't go to anderson cooper and then cause the white house to react to what they're seeing on cnn. so, how do you get in front of that news cycle? and the only way you can do that as tip o'neill said, all things in politics are local and i think we heard from vice admiral nathan that i think all responses are local as well. and, so, we really need to start most importantly at the local level, at those planning levels, because the first shot of any campaign, the plan will change, but the partnerships need to remain constant. >> and, general baldwin, we heard from colonel span owe about now your three hats of authority, your state hat, your federal hat, and now your dual status hat. but if you could talk about the partnerships an
to the northeast. pay back for all the help they got after hurricane katrina. >> we wanted to reach out and help them like some people helped us. >> shepard: tonight, all aboard the train of hope. but first from fox this monday night, pillow talk and national security. fox news confirms or has confirmed that the cia found classified documents on the computer that belongs to paula broadwell. she is the woman who had an affair with the then cia david petraeus. there is nothing to indicate that these documents actually came from general petraeus himself. the general stepped down as the cia director last friday but questions remain about whether his once secret lover knew information she should not have known. prince, consider paula broadwell's comments during a speech in denver last month during which she spoke about the attack on our consulate in benghazi, libya. >> i don't know if a lot of you heard this but the cia annex had actually taken a couple of libyan militia members prisoner they think the attack on the consulate was to try to get these prisoners back. it's still being vetted. >> shepard
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 150 (some duplicates have been removed)